[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

(Source: forassgard, via blackgirlnerds)

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

being black is really wonderful and convenient bc i can just be sitting here in my room like this

image

and whenever people come looking for me to do stuff i dont even really have to hide all i have to do it turn off my light and

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and then when they leave i just 

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ive received this question so many times since i posted this yesterday so imma just leave this right here ok  

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GOD THIS IS ME EVERY FUCKING TIME ON SKYPE

(via meldrat)

lokispants:

I have every right. You will never have. Not until you cease from judging the entire world as those above and those below and begin to see people as people. Human beings who think and feel no more or less than you do.

*stands up and slow claps*

(via blackgirlnerds)

brichibi:

blackgirlnerds:

Things I Wish I’d Known Growing up as a Black Girl Nerd

Growing up is always tough. But there’s something unique about the black girl nerd experience. There’s no prototype for the black girl nerd; no famous fictional adolescents whose path we could mirror…

I’m not a girl but I do agree with this. 

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: 
For week three of my Koons-O-Rama, here’s Jeff’s Hennessy, The Civilized Way to Lay Down the Law, made in 1986 and yet another gem in his Whitney retrospective. It’s a straight re-presentation of an eighties liquor ad, although printed on canvas to become fine art. It establishes Koons as one of our most perceptive painters of modern life, such as Baudelaire would have admired. Forget feeding that life through an artist’s eye; for this piece, Koons saw that the world was strange enough to be shown as-is.
The insane overkill of the ad’s semiotics is something to behold. The young, Barbie-nosed black woman is inviting her studious black husband to bed – why, he’s been working until quarter-past-two in the morning (as the clock’s hands tell us) while his little lady has awaited his favors  (note the dent in her pillow). Finally, throwing on (barely) her man’s classy Oxford-cloth shirt, she’s decided to get help from Hennessy. She’s come hunting for lion (note the statuette on his desk) and has no truck for law books (the fat old volumes and legal pad in front of him). Just because he got to college on that baseball scholarship of his (his prize ball sits on a shelf), that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to life except schooling. Sure, we’re still in an old apartment in Harlem (the radiator is old-style; above it, the window faces south, with careful cutouts of the Chrysler Building and Empire State placed in the far distance). But Hey, Baby, we can drink up, have sex and still end up in a condo downtown. This Hennessy sure is the World’s Most Civilized Spirit, ‘cause it can even civilize us.
It’s not so hard to spot the ad’s racial cliches once Koons has focused his art on them. What’s impressive is that he spotted them out in the world and realized they deserved art’s attention. So much for this artist as politics-free. (Collection of David and Monica Zwirner; © Jeff Koons)
The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

I used to see ads like this in old issues of EBONY and ESSENCE magazine.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:

For week three of my Koons-O-Rama, here’s Jeff’s Hennessy, The Civilized Way to Lay Down the Law, made in 1986 and yet another gem in his Whitney retrospective. It’s a straight re-presentation of an eighties liquor ad, although printed on canvas to become fine art. It establishes Koons as one of our most perceptive painters of modern life, such as Baudelaire would have admired. Forget feeding that life through an artist’s eye; for this piece, Koons saw that the world was strange enough to be shown as-is.

The insane overkill of the ad’s semiotics is something to behold. The young, Barbie-nosed black woman is inviting her studious black husband to bed – why, he’s been working until quarter-past-two in the morning (as the clock’s hands tell us) while his little lady has awaited his favors  (note the dent in her pillow). Finally, throwing on (barely) her man’s classy Oxford-cloth shirt, she’s decided to get help from Hennessy. She’s come hunting for lion (note the statuette on his desk) and has no truck for law books (the fat old volumes and legal pad in front of him). Just because he got to college on that baseball scholarship of his (his prize ball sits on a shelf), that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to life except schooling. Sure, we’re still in an old apartment in Harlem (the radiator is old-style; above it, the window faces south, with careful cutouts of the Chrysler Building and Empire State placed in the far distance). But Hey, Baby, we can drink up, have sex and still end up in a condo downtown. This Hennessy sure is the World’s Most Civilized Spirit, ‘cause it can even civilize us.

It’s not so hard to spot the ad’s racial cliches once Koons has focused his art on them. What’s impressive is that he spotted them out in the world and realized they deserved art’s attention. So much for this artist as politics-free. (Collection of David and Monica Zwirner; © Jeff Koons)

The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

I used to see ads like this in old issues of EBONY and ESSENCE magazine.

(via kangaroobeer)

Anger Management

How does Darkness manage anger?By asking you to manage your distance.

Anger Management

How does Darkness manage anger?

By asking you to manage your distance.

thisiscitylab:


With views of the downtown skyline, the $1.1 billion new Indianapolis airport has been celebrated for its sense of place, and for treating its passengers as “guests,” much the way the hotel industry does. It has its own civic plaza, a light-filled central space with 35-foot ceilings that functions as the nexus of activity—every passenger, whether arriving or departing, passes through—where half of all the airport’s shops and restaurants reside. Customers routinely comment on the terminal’s calm feel, and on its efficiency and easy navigation. Though Indianapolis is a small city (population 843,000, but growing fast), it hosts what Chicas calls “the equivalent of three to four Super Bowls a year”—major sporting events like the Indy 500, the NCAA Final Four, the NFL combines, and, in 2011, the actual Super Bowl.
But even as passenger traffic balloons for these occasions, security checkpoints here are rarely clogged. What is Indy doing right?

-The Next-Generation Airport Is a Destination in Its Own Right
[Photo: HOK]

Yay 317 representin’

thisiscitylab:

With views of the downtown skyline, the $1.1 billion new Indianapolis airport has been celebrated for its sense of place, and for treating its passengers as “guests,” much the way the hotel industry does. It has its own civic plaza, a light-filled central space with 35-foot ceilings that functions as the nexus of activity—every passenger, whether arriving or departing, passes through—where half of all the airport’s shops and restaurants reside. Customers routinely comment on the terminal’s calm feel, and on its efficiency and easy navigation. Though Indianapolis is a small city (population 843,000, but growing fast), it hosts what Chicas calls “the equivalent of three to four Super Bowls a year”—major sporting events like the Indy 500, the NCAA Final Four, the NFL combines, and, in 2011, the actual Super Bowl.

But even as passenger traffic balloons for these occasions, security checkpoints here are rarely clogged. What is Indy doing right?

-The Next-Generation Airport Is a Destination in Its Own Right

[Photo: HOK]

Yay 317 representin’

composersdoingnormalshit:

Igor Stravinsky playing with Charlie Chaplin in a rolling hoop thingy.

LOL this is awesome.

composersdoingnormalshit:

Igor Stravinsky playing with Charlie Chaplin in a rolling hoop thingy.

LOL this is awesome.

redbellied-piranha:

kidbuudha:

thetpr:

gang0fwolves:

" why don’t they use water cannons? "

bitch…

WOW

Y’all caught ya boy’s look on his face though right?????

Bruh he wasn’t having it

Leave it to white people to say something incredibly stupid…

(via axelkatten)

And the rest of us are not treated like human beings. Period. (x)

*slow clapping begins* ….THIS.

(Source: yugottabesonice, via meldrat)